You’re nearly there! You can see the light peaking at the end of the tunnel and graduation day is on the horizon. You’ll soon submit your final project, take your last exam, and give cheers alongside friends and family once you’ve walked the stage. It’s the end of an era.

After the dust from graduation day settles, everyone will want to know the next steps you’ll take in the “real world.” You might find yourself a little lost and intimidated. However hazy your future may feel, a few things are certain: entering the job market and new bills – in other words, adulting.

And if you’re like most of all college students, you likely took out a student loan to help pay for your education. At one time, your student loan provider seemed like a distant, generous benefactor, but soon they’ll come around to collect on that assistance – with interest. There is no better time than now to begin thinking about your student loan repayment options. That payment will be here sooner than you think.

When do student loan payments start?

It depends. Some student loans include a grace period before the first payment is due to give you time to find a job and earn enough income to manage the additional payment. Other loans don’t have a grace period. Here’s one last homework assignment for you. Do some research and find out:

·       Your payment amount and when interest will start accruing on your loan.

·       If your loan has a grace period and when your first payment is due.

·       How your first payment due date will change if you’re active duty military or enroll to go back to school.

Every loan is different, but according to the Federal Reserve, the average student loan payment ranges from $200 to $400 monthly. If you didn’t rely on a budget in college, now would be the time to jot down your current and projected bills compared against your estimated income. Accounting for this additional bill now will help you avoid, what seems like, an endless cycle of debt later.

Work smarter, not harder.

Adulting is inevitable, but you’re not alone. Plus, with some options and resources at your disposal, it doesn’t have to be unbearable. My Education Solutions (MES) is committed to helping student loan borrowers avoid financial strife, so they can truly succeed and pursue the life they’ve always imagined.

·       Free resources. MES offers FREE consulting and materials to student loan borrowers, as well as soon-to-be grads’, to prepare for the repayment process, as well as tools to begin to save now.

·       True student loan forgiveness. Millions of Americans are struggling to manage student loan debt, but you don’t have to. Why suffer financially for years, when MES can help you navigate the path to true student loan forgiveness now? Contact an MES representative at 1-800-618-1170 or visit www.myeducationsolutions.com to discuss the no-risk program and how you can begin to save hundreds on your monthly payment.

·       Don’t wait – calculate! Visit www.myeducationsolutions.com to check out the MES Student Loan Forgiveness Calculator. Answer a couple of questions and see if you qualify for savings in a few easy steps. For less than five minutes of your time, there’s nothing to lose – and thousands of dollars to gain.

Did someone say free money?

A peace of mind graduation gift, if you will. You’ve put in years of hard work and deserve to see your degree as a tool for success, competitive advantage, and significant accomplishment – not a burden. That’s why MES is giving back to the higher education community by providing a $5,000 Freedom Grant to one lucky graduate from Texas A&M University in San Antonio.

The deadline to apply for this grant is Dec. 2, 2019 for Spring and Fall graduates. Visit https://https://myedusolutions.com/tamusa/ to apply and learn more. Stay tuned as we announce grant opportunities with additional college and university partners across the nation!

Sources:

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/files/2017-report-economic-well-being-us-households-201805.pdf

https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand

https://ticas.org/sites/default/files/pub_files/classof2017.pdf

https://www.consumerfinance.gov/about-us/newsroom/cfpb-finds-percentage-borrowers-20k-student-debt-doubled-over-last-decade/

https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/interactives/householdcredit/data/pdf/HHDC_2018Q3.pdf